GeneralPost Your Cozy Covid Workplace

 

Press Ctrl+Enter to quickly submit your post
Quick Reply  
 
 
  
 From:  koswix  
 To:  graphitone     
42605.61 In reply to 42605.42 
Most of the art was my mum's (the flower ones she made), there's no particular theme. They were lying around for 2 years in a pile, wasn't sure where to put them when tidying up so i just banged a bunch of nails up all over the place and stuck them on the wall. I guess that's sort of what you're meant to do with them.

The fire extinguisher (and fire blanket) are from my welding bay (which no longer exists since I turned the garage into a wood and CNC workshop, need to build a new welding bay), I know use it to fend off H&S managers who want to do risk assessments for working from home.

 ▪                    
             ┌────┐    ┌────┐                      
          │    │    │    │ ▪                    
          │    └────┘    │                      
          │   ──┐  ┌──   │ ▪                    
   ┌──────┤    ▪    ▪    │                      
  ┌┘      │              │ ▪                    
┌─┤       └──┐  │  │  ┌──┘                      
│ │          │ ││  ││ │   ┌─┐                   
│ │          └─┼┤  └┴─┴───┘ │                   
│ │           ─┘│           │                   
│ │   ┌──────┐  └┬──────────┘                   
  │   │      │   │                              
  │   │      │   │                              
  └───┘      └───┘                              
If Feds call you and say something bad on me, it may prove what I said are truth, they are afraid of it.
0/0
 Reply   Quote More 

 From:  patch  
 To:  milko     
42605.62 In reply to 42605.58 
Hello!

I'm still in Auckland, the part of New Zealand that isn't like the rest of New Zealand. Just coming to the last few days of the "Level 4" lockdown that we've been in for the last four weeks. The announcement of whether it gets extended or reduced to, say, Level 3 will be this afternoon. Level 3 being the same as Level 4, but the takeaways can open. Which will be great - I'd forgotten how hard it is to think of a different meal to cook every day of the week. Might even be able to make it to the beach without feeling guilty about not staying within the postcode.

I'd show a photo of my WFH desk, but it's a desk. A bit like Matt's desk, but messier, and a bit like Dave!!'s desk, but smaller.
0/0
 Reply   Quote More 

 From:  Mouse  
 To:  ALL
42605.63 In reply to 42605.62 
I don't really have a desk but I have a garden which I'm very thankful for at the moment.

Roses are bollocks, Violets are crud, I hate bloody flowers, And much prefer mud.

Attachments:

0/0
 Reply   Quote More 

 From:  Serg (NUKKLEAR)  
 To:  ALL
42605.64 
I was going to say that I may have gone a bit too far on the screen front, but I seem to be in good company. Don't have my own mancave anymore since the little monster came along, so it's just the corner of a bedroom.
[...Insert Brain Here...]

Attachments:

0/0
 Reply   Quote More 

 From:  Kenny J (WINGNUTKJ)  
 To:  Serg (NUKKLEAR)     
42605.65 In reply to 42605.64 
Can't believe you'd have a canister of dihydrogen monoxide sitting RIGHT THERE on your desk, where a small child could easily grab it. Tissues won't help you if that happens.

Kenny
0/0
 Reply   Quote More 

 From:  CHYRON (DSMITHHFX)   
 To:  Serg (NUKKLEAR)     
42605.66 In reply to 42605.64 
It hurts my neck just to look at that.
“a man gets struck by lightning and goes “zzzt”, Jason gets shot and dies and the submarine blows up.”
0/0
 Reply   Quote More 

 From:  Serg (NUKKLEAR)  
 To:  Kenny J (WINGNUTKJ)     
42605.67 In reply to 42605.65 
Can't believe you'd have a canister of dihydrogen monoxide sitting RIGHT THERE on your desk, where a small child could easily grab it. Tissues won't help you if that happens.
She's full of it. Darn kids.
It hurts my neck just to look at that.

It's not as terrible as it looks, but yes it's not ideal... stuff that I look at less often goes on top.

[...Insert Brain Here...]
0/0
 Reply   Quote More 

 From:  andy  
 To:  milko     
42605.68 In reply to 42605.60 
hello! see other thread. i live in harringay in north london with my wife and 2-year-old daughter these days (actually moved in february, just in the nick of time for covid - upgraded from a basement flat in whitechapel to a house with a garden, thank baby jesus).

here's my desk!

Attachments:

+1/1
 Reply   Quote More 

 From:  ANT_THOMAS  
 To:  graphitone     
42605.69 In reply to 42605.43 
Meant to reply the other week. I converted a flatbed scanner to a UV exposure box in Feb for my girlfriend to use, as she had experimented with the cyanotype process in the past but hadn't done as much as she wanted to due to the lack of decent sun in the UK. I saw some examples of UV exposure units and Rich off here sent me his old scanner to tear apart. Added a screen and used the existing buttons to control time and brightness. Arduino in the back doing the clevers.




This was my first (or maybe second) attempt. I printed a photo of mine on to tracing paper then exposed on some chemical covered paper.



Since done more, here are some examples. I tend to do photos, girlfriend enjoys exposing actual items (yj) (flowers, leaves, feathers etc). These were all 15 minute exposures using negatives printed on transparencies. 

  

This was an attempt to get as much feather detail as possible. Total unknown until you try various lengths of time. Tried 15 mins, 30 mins and 45 mins. This was the 45 min attempt. I think the 15 min attempt was mostly white where the feather is - meaning not exposed enough at all since the feather blocks the UV getting to the paper.



The 3 photos in the middle were exposed using a small 6x4 sized unit I made for myself

0/0
 Reply   Quote More 

 From:  koswix  
 To:  ANT_THOMAS     
42605.70 In reply to 42605.69 
These are bloody great!

 

 ▪                    
             ┌────┐    ┌────┐                      
          │    │    │    │ ▪                    
          │    └────┘    │                      
          │   ──┐  ┌──   │ ▪                    
   ┌──────┤    ▪    ▪    │                      
  ┌┘      │              │ ▪                    
┌─┤       └──┐  │  │  ┌──┘                      
│ │          │ ││  ││ │   ┌─┐                   
│ │          └─┼┤  └┴─┴───┘ │                   
│ │           ─┘│           │                   
│ │   ┌──────┐  └┬──────────┘                   
  │   │      │   │                              
  │   │      │   │                              
  └───┘      └───┘                              
If Feds call you and say something bad on me, it may prove what I said are truth, they are afraid of it.
0/0
 Reply   Quote More 

 From:  william (WILLIAMA)  
 To:  koswix     
42605.71 In reply to 42605.70 
They are, aren't they. I missed this post somehow. Interested to find that the cyanotype process is the origin of the name 'blueprint'.
never trust a man in a blue trench coat, never drive a car when you're dead
0/0
 Reply   Quote More 

 From:  ANT_THOMAS  
 To:  ALL
42605.72 
Fanx chaps. I have toyed with the idea of darkroom development and a bit of analogue film photography but felt it was a rabbit hole I didn't want to go down.

This on the other hand feels like a good balance of it all, especially because it is relatively simple (in comparison to darkroom development) and the results can be quite nice. The chemical use/process interests me because of my Chemistry degree so it ticks a box there.

I think I'll find it interesting to figure out what types of photo transfer well to this format.

Of the above
Forest (Sequoia National Park) - good
Train (Barmouth Bridge) - good
Sunrise (Madeira) - not good
Chapel (Madeira) - good

I think images with a good degree of difference between light and dark come out better.
0/0
 Reply   Quote More 

 From:  graphitone  
 To:  ANT_THOMAS     
42605.73 In reply to 42605.72 
What Kos said.

They're brilliant.

Like in traditional dark rooms are you able to control the exposure in real time, so remove the image from the developing process when you're happy with it, and is there another stage you need to do to fix the image to stop it from developing further?

What do you reckon you've spent to get your setup going?
0/0
 Reply   Quote More 

 From:  ANT_THOMAS  
 To:  graphitone     
42605.74 In reply to 42605.73 
It is really difficult to tell if you've got what you want because, as you've asked, there is a fixing process - literally just wash the sheet in water to remove the undeveloped parts. But it's difficult to see how the finished and washed print will turn out without actually doing it. Or at least I'm unable to tell as yet.

These are the train/bridge and the sunrise just after being removed from the UV box and before washing

 


And the sunrise being washed





In terms of costs - I've probably spent around £60ish maybe so far and I've now got enough kit to last me ages. You could probably start with one of the £20-£30 chemical kits, add some paper, a cheap photo frame to hold item/negative to paper, then use the sun to do the exposing on a sunny day. The reel of UV LEDs cost around £10 and was more than enough for the scanner conversion, my mini box and have a few sections left over.
0/0
 Reply   Quote More 

 From:  Manthorp  
 To:  ANT_THOMAS     
42605.75 In reply to 42605.69 
Really nice. I'm working with a couple of artists using cyanotype atm. It must be a thing.

"We all have flaws, and mine is being wicked."
James Thurber, The Thirteen Clocks 1951
 
0/0
 Reply   Quote More 

 From:  ANT_THOMAS  
 To:  Manthorp     
42605.76 In reply to 42605.75 
Would be interested to see what they're doing with it.

I've got a little project in mind to do some in-camera cyanotype. So the picture would only be the size of a 35mm negative, and I would imagine it could take upwards of 30 minutes to get an image exposed on a sunny day. Would need to be a landscape!
0/0
 Reply   Quote More 

 From:  Peter (BOUGHTONP)  
 To:  ANT_THOMAS     
42605.77 In reply to 42605.72 
> I think images with a good degree of difference between light and dark come out better.

Yep, it'll mostly be same as would apply to regular monochrome - images where contrasting tones and textures are [part of] the main subject, so long as the tint doesn't work against it.

0/0
 Reply   Quote More 

 From:  Peter (BOUGHTONP)  
 To:  ANT_THOMAS     
42605.78 In reply to 42605.74 
> It is really difficult to tell if you've got what you want because, as you've asked, there is a fixing process...

Have you thought about using Cyanotype filters digitally to preview what you'd get? By processing test cards you could calibrate the effects of different durations and materials, and work out what combination produces the preferred result - or would you consider that cheating / is the surprise/uncertainty part of what you enjoy?

0/0
 Reply   Quote More 

 From:  ANT_THOMAS  
 To:  Peter (BOUGHTONP)     
42605.79 In reply to 42605.78 
Quote: 
Yep, it'll mostly be same as would apply to regular monochrome - images where contrasting tones and textures are [part of] the main subject, so long as the tint doesn't work against it.

Yeah, that's definitely the case. And even more exaggerated because the dynamic range of cyantoype is quite limited. Seen a few guides about playing with curves to ensure there's not too much lost in an attempt to get the detail where you want it.
 
Quote: 
Have you thought about using Cyanotype filters digitally to preview what you'd get? By processing test cards you could calibrate the effects of different durations and materials, and work out what combination produces the preferred result - or would you consider that cheating / is the surprise/uncertainty part of what you enjoy?

I've definitely thought about this. I did some test prints initially with the UV scanner where I slid out a card to block/increase exposure time just to have some idea of what it was capable of and what settings to start with since it was a complete unknown for me.

Part of me hates the uncertainty of it, part of me loves it.
I don't want it to become too formulaic because then it's less of an art and can become boring. But who wants to waste time producing rubbish prints?



 
0/0
 Reply   Quote More 

 From:  CHYRON (DSMITHHFX)   
 To:  Manthorp     
42605.80 In reply to 42605.75 
Deffo it's a thing. Also wet-plate collodion and daguerreotypes even.
“If you want your resume to stand out, you need accomplishments.”

“Various unpleasant jobs using programming languages I didn't like. Fixed a few things and moved some trivial features forward slightly. Quit in a huff. Hire me!”
0/0
 Reply   Quote More 

Reply to All  
 

1–20  21–40  41–60  61–80  81–100  101

Rate my interest:

Adjust text size : Smaller 10 Larger

Beehive Forum 1.5.2 |  FAQ |  Docs |  Support |  Donate! ©2002 - 2020 Project Beehive Forum

Forum Stats