Music, Film, TV & BooksShape of Water

 

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 From:  Very Stable Genius (DSMITHHFX)  
 To:  ALL
42097.1 
This is (I think) the third Guillermo del Toro film I've seen,not counting two Hellboys, the first two being Pan's Labyrinth (captivating) and the aptly-titled Crimson Peak (crimson as in blood-drenched). This one's quite different and features some of the lyricism of Pan, very little horror (the monsters are all human), and extensive stylish and humorous quotes from past eras in Hollywood and early television (it even has a clip from Mister Ed!). Well worth seeing. A cat is eaten.
“Professional disagreement over how photos of galaxies are interpreted escalates into bullying & harassment”
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 From:  Very Stable Genius (DSMITHHFX)  
 To:  ALL
42097.2 
Quote: 
not counting two Hellboys


Interesting conceptual link to Hellboy (dunno why this hadn't occurred to me before):

https://screenrant.com/shape-of-water-hellboy-prequel-connections/

(may contain spoilers)

“Professional disagreement over how photos of galaxies are interpreted escalates into bullying & harassment”
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 From:  william (WILLIAMA)  
 To:  Very Stable Genius (DSMITHHFX)     
42097.3 In reply to 42097.2 
I haven't seen it yet, but what did surprise me was just how many of his films I have seen, without doing a sort of GdT fanboy thing: at least not intentionally. Apart from Shape of Water, I haven't seen Mimic (I don't think I've seen it. What I watched late at night in a drunken stupor as a feckless youth doesn't count) and a couple of his very early short pieces.

I really like the way that he isn't shy of handling both really serious philosophical/political ideas and super-popular blockbuster stuff, and mixing the two up. For my money he does it much better than many others.
never trust a man in a blue trench coat, never drive a car when you're dead
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 From:  Very Stable Genius (DSMITHHFX)  
 To:  william (WILLIAMA)     
42097.4 In reply to 42097.3 
I guess I forgot (or never knew) he did Mimic. So that would be the first GdT film I've seen. Interesting to compare his approach to Tarantino, who possesses a similar mastery of film vocabularly and history, yet seems unable to transcend his own penchant for silliness.
“Professional disagreement over how photos of galaxies are interpreted escalates into bullying & harassment”
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 From:  william (WILLIAMA)  
 To:  Very Stable Genius (DSMITHHFX)     
42097.5 In reply to 42097.4 
I kind of agree. Pulp fiction is almost completely sure-footed but there are just a few points where he gets carried away. For instance, the adrenaline shot is very funny but belongs in a different film because it just manages to overdo the implausibility - it breaks the (admittedly silly) science of Pulp Fiction's world. It would be fine in Kill Bill. 

On the other hand, I kind of disagree, in that I like his silliness and it's quite useful in films like Inglourious basterds.
never trust a man in a blue trench coat, never drive a car when you're dead
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 From:  Very Stable Genius (DSMITHHFX)  
 To:  william (WILLIAMA)     
42097.6 In reply to 42097.5 
Yeah, I like his silliness too, but it is a limitation.
“Professional disagreement over how photos of galaxies are interpreted escalates into bullying & harassment”
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 From:  Laurence Burke (LAURENCE_BURKE)  
 To:  Very Stable Genius (DSMITHHFX)     
42097.7 In reply to 42097.6 
I also like his silliness to friend.

APPROVED: 17 Jan 12:02 by MILKO

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 From:  william (WILLIAMA)  
 To:  Very Stable Genius (DSMITHHFX)     
42097.8 In reply to 42097.1 
Finally saw it. Feeling a bit ambivalent really. I thoroughly enjoyed it, but at the same time I felt a bit 'is that all there is?' at the end. All of the performances were good, especially Sally Hawkins, but apart from her they didn't break a sweat fitting (albeit very well) into well-worn character roles. I felt the fish-man was underdone to the point where I longed for something to make me care about his fate, or think of him as anything other than a bloke in a fish costume. There was a kind of polished reproduction-world thing going on: the feeling that the world where the film was staged was an immense and detailed museum. Films that do this kind of things , for instance Amelie, the Grand Budapest Hotel, Hugo and probably several others, usually use the style to showcase fast-moving, complex plots. The plot here is as simple as it gets and the result is that although it looks gorgeous, it also looks (imho) a tad thin.

A few reviewers have said that it's his best film. For me it isn't quite up there with Cronos, the Devil's Backbone and Pan's Labyrinth.
never trust a man in a blue trench coat, never drive a car when you're dead
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 From:  Austin (COREY_AUSTIN)  
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42097.9 
Hi friends does anyone watch Shape of Water movie is it really good movie? any suggestion

APPROVED: 5 Jul 17:50 by MATT

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 From:  william (WILLIAMA)  
 To:  ALL
42097.10 
Can I assume that 42097.9 concerns 'Secrets of Netflix' or 'Grow an extra willy in 3 easy steps' or are all the mods off enjoying the exceptional UK sunshine?
never trust a man in a blue trench coat, never drive a car when you're dead
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 From:  Very Stable Genius (DSMITHHFX)  
 To:  william (WILLIAMA)     
42097.11 In reply to 42097.10 
Perhaps another non sequitur like 42097.7?
“Canada has been taking advantage of the niceness of the United States”
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 From:  william (WILLIAMA)  
 To:  Very Stable Genius (DSMITHHFX)     
42097.12 In reply to 42097.11 
Quite likely. There's another post awaiting moderation somewhere. I can't remember which thread.

Edit: Oh, right. I see. And the other one as well.
never trust a man in a blue trench coat, never drive a car when you're dead
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 From:  Very Stable Genius (DSMITHHFX)  
 To:  william (WILLIAMA)     
42097.13 In reply to 42097.12 
Speaks bottish...
“Canada has been taking advantage of the niceness of the United States”
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 From:  Manthorp  
 To:  Very Stable Genius (DSMITHHFX)     
42097.14 In reply to 42097.1 
I loved it.  My mum - a discerning art house-filmgoer at 84 - hated it for the violence, which she always hates.

It was one of those classic recursive paeons of love to cinema by a director utterly consumed by the form.  The attention to period art direction was meticulous, even if the script & acting didn't quite follow suit. The ending was inevitable from within the first hour.

FWR: Free Willy with willy.

"We all have flaws, and mine is being wicked."
James Thurber, The Thirteen Clocks 1951
 
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 From:  william (WILLIAMA)  
 To:  Manthorp     
42097.15 In reply to 42097.14 
I kind of agree. My issue is that I think that in his consumption of and by the form, he lost track of the script and acting far too much.
never trust a man in a blue trench coat, never drive a car when you're dead
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 From:  Very Stable Genius (DSMITHHFX)  
 To:  Manthorp     
42097.16 In reply to 42097.14 
I thought the ending revelation where, it transpired, the heroine has gills, which she herself hadn't known was masterfully subtle.
“Canada has been taking advantage of the niceness of the United States”
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 From:  Manthorp  
 To:  Very Stable Genius (DSMITHHFX)     
42097.17 In reply to 42097.16 
I hope that was written in blue ink, Smiffy, cos I had it taped from the first mention of the scar.  I mean, hell, the movie starts with her wanking in a bath...

"We all have flaws, and mine is being wicked."
James Thurber, The Thirteen Clocks 1951
 
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